James Madison University

Research

Using Distance Coaching for Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT) for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties

Supervising Investigator: Dr. Trevor Stokes
Contact: Kirstin Drucker, Baird Center, druckeka@dukes.jmu.edu

The purpose of the current study is to determine if using distance coaching to provide Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), simultaneously, will significantly reduce a student’s emotional and behavioral difficulties in both the home and school settings. Because both PCIT and TCIT have been shown to have positive outcomes for children with developmental and behavioral challenges, this study will investigate whether if both therapies are done at the same time it will have similar outcomes. Additionally, as teletherapy becomes more commonplace, it will be important to determine if videoconferencing platforms can be used to provide these interventions.

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) with a Function-Based Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities

Supervising Investigator: Dr. Trevor Stokes
Contact: Melissa Grant, Baird Center, grantmr@dukes.jmu.edu

The goal of the current study is to demonstrate that Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) can inform Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) procedures for a more effective reduction of disruptive behavior (e.g., aggression, property destruction, noncompliance, etc.) and increase positive skills (e.g., compliance) for children with developmental disabilities. Therapists working with children with developmental disabilities will be coached on both PCIT and ABA techniques using a bug-in-the-ear system. Coaching will be directed to enhance therapists' mastery skills consistent with recognized best practices in treatment.

Human Face Processing

Principal Investigator: Dr. Krisztina Jakobsen
Contact: Krisztina Jakobsen, Department of Psychology and Baird Center; 
jakobskv@jmu.edu

There is debate as to whether all primate faces are processed by a human face recognition system, or whether only human faces are processed by this system. The former idea predicts that all primate faces should be processed in similar ways, while the latter predicts that human faces should enjoy privileged processing.  Recent studies find that infants and adults detect human faces more quickly than they detect objects and other animals.  Current research is exploring the extent to which infants' experience with human faces plays a role in their ability to detect human faces with which they are familiar compared to faces with which they have less experience.

Using Evidence-Based Teaching Practices

Principal Investigator: Dr. Krisztina Jakobsen
Contact: Krisztina Jakobsen, Department of Psychology and Baird Center; 
jakobskv@jmu.edu

The use of evidence-based teaching practices helps build a learning environment that is conducive for student learning. We have two primary goals with regard to evidence-based teaching practices, (1) to contribute to the field through research studies, (2) to disseminate research findings to teachers in the community.